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Greek Kaseri Cheese Pie — Κασερόπιτα

Greek Kaseri Cheese Pie — Κασερόπιτα

I love tyropita (Greek cheese pie) no matter what type. All that cheesy, gooey goodness tucked away in flaky phyllo gets me every time. And though there are a few well known tyropita basics in Greek cuisine, the possibilities are truly endless. There’s the classic Feta cheese tyropita; then there is the “cut a few corners and still get a delicious tyropita“; and there is even the “throw anything you’d like in,” i.e. artichokes to get an Agginarotyropita instead.
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“Deconstructed Caponata” and Feta Baked with Peperoncini

“Deconstructed Caponata” and Feta Baked with Peperoncini

I’d heard, seen and read the term caponata across numerous foodie media outlets for years now. If, however, you sat me down all this time and asked just what a traditional caponata is, I’d inevitably bite my lip and mutter a deflated “ummmm.” It wasn’t until I clicked on Foodalogue the other day and thoroughly read Joan’s post, that it was finally cemented into my stubbornbrain just what a real caponata is comprised of.
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Macaroni and Cheese with a Greek Twist

Macaroni and Cheese with a Greek Twist

This is a pretty straightforward recipe … a  simple “Mediterranean” play on Mac n Cheese, if you will. Natasha over at 5 Star Foodie hosts the monthly event dubbed the “5 Star Makeover Challenge” by way of which she urges fellow bloggers to revamp a popular dish/recipe each month. For example, January focused on cornbread, February on mousse and March on compound butter. This month (April) the challenge is to makeover a pasta dish.
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Κυριακή των Βαΐων — Palm Sunday (and a yummy Tyropita)

Κυριακή των Βαΐων — Palm Sunday (and a yummy Tyropita)

Yesterday was Palm Sunday, which signaled the start of Holy Week for Orthodox Christians (and most Christians as Easter this year falls on the same day).  Palm Sunday is a feast day commemorating Jesus’ entry into Jerusalem in the days before His Passion. In the Greek Orthodox Church (as in many Christian churches), palm leaves tied into crosses are distributed to churchgoers at the end of the morning’s liturgy.