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Insalata di Baccalà / Μπακαλιαρος Σαλάτα / Salt Cod Salad and Christmas Eve Traditions

Insalata di Baccalà / Μπακαλιαρος Σαλάτα / Salt Cod Salad and Christmas Eve Traditions

For my family here in New York, Christmas Eve is always spent at my aunt & uncle’s home as my aunt has hosted the holiday every year for 30+ years in honor of my uncle’s nameday. The food we indulge in is usually a mix of typical Greek dishes as well as some Greek-American favorites: baked ham, pork/chicken “kabobs” with peppers and onions baked in a light tomato sauce, roast beef, pastitsio, roasted potatoes, taramosalata, tzatziki, spanakopita, tyropita and all the typical Greek Christmas sweets including kourambiedes, melomakarona and
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Mediterranean Cod and Hash Browns

Mediterranean Cod and Hash Browns

I was going to wait until I made this dish again and actually got some decent photos in daylight before posting the recipe. But I was so impressed by its simplicity and great flavor, that I was too eager to wait. So here it goes …  Got a skillet? Got 30 to 45 minutes? I’m pretty darn sure you do and as such you’ve got no excuse not to try this healthy, flavorful meal on any given weeknight.
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Mπουρδέτο (με Σκορπιούς) — Bourdetto (Stewed Scorpion Fish)

Mπουρδέτο (με Σκορπιούς) — Bourdetto (Stewed Scorpion Fish)

During my first visit to my husband’s family in Greece back in 2005, my husband’s late grandfather would talk to me every chance he got about three things each and every time I saw him: his late wife (my husband’s Giagia Sofia), his grandson (my husband) and his favorite dish (Bourdetto). He would mention this dish repeatedly every time I would visit him in his apartment in Athens and then finally one warm October afternoon, I sat down to lunch with him to try his favorite dish.
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Baked Sardines — Ψητές Σαρδέλες

Baked Sardines — Ψητές Σαρδέλες

Sardines (known as Sardeles in Greek) are a popular fish among Greeks. Aside from being flavorful, easily accessible and inexpensive, they are packed with vitamins and rich in so many nutrients we all surely need more of these days.
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Bakaliarakia Tiganita kai Skordalia me Kappari–Fried Whiting with a Caper Skordalia

I’m lucky to have children who love to eat fish. Even luckier, I believe, that fish in New York is pretty inexpensive and pretty fresh. Family favorites such as Red Snapper (Synagrida) run between $6.99 and $7.99 a pound while Porgies (Tsipoures) and Sardines (Sardela) can be found for $2.99 a pound. I went to the fish market yesterday intent on buying Barbounia (Red Mullet, which were $6.99 a pound) as we hadn’t had these tasty little fish in a long while. But when I got to the store, I quickly snapped up the smaller Bakaliarakia (Whitings) that I know the
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Synagrida me Estragon sto Fourno — Red Snapper Baked with Tarragon

Synagrida (Greek for red snapper) is my favorite fish. I love its tender meat and its versatility as it can easily be grilled, baked or broiled whole and paired with virtually any sauce or flavoring. Simply grilled and then dressed with ladolemono (olive oil-lemon sauce) is probably my favorite way to enjoy this red-fleshed fish when eating at a taverna, but at home I like to prepare it either plaki or baked then broiled with different herbs, lemon juice and olive oil surrounded by thinly-sliced potatoes for a tasty and healthy one-pan meal. Having bought some fresh

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